Nevada, National and International News

Subcommittee Chair Duncan Opening Remarks on Improving Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

“In 1987, after the Department of Energy conducted extensive studies of nine potential repository sites, Congress amended the Nuclear Policy Act to focus on Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, as the site for a permanent geologic repository.

Connecticut is searching for solutions for its nuclear waste. Could Finland hold the answers?

Efforts to develop a more permanent storage site, such as those at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain, have repeatedly fizzled. Local officials in towns like Waterford, meanwhile, have grown frustrated at the impasse.

Andre Landim Fernandes To Pioneer Sustainable Engineering Solutions in the U.S.

Despite lengthy discussions and research, a permanent repository for high-level radioactive waste has not been established, with the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada facing political and regulatory blockades (National Research Council, 2021). This predicament exerts considerable pressure on engineering firms to find reliable, temporary storage solutions and to innovate in crafting long-term disposal methods that are both publicly and regulatorily acceptable.

Federal appeals court nixes license for nuclear storage site

The United States has no such permanent site for nuclear waste. It scrapped plans for Nevada’s Yucca Mountain in 2010 and no alternate sites are in the works.

Panel Discussion Suggests Connecticut’s Nuclear Waste Is Not Going Anywhere Soon

The United States’ attempts to find a permanent home for its nuclear waste began in the 1980s when the government planned to build a long-term nuclear repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, but that project was plagued by opposition. Activities on site ceased in 2010, leaving the nation’s nuclear waste to be stored more or less locally, where it’s been produced. The United States’ attempts to find a permanent home for its nuclear waste began in the 1980s when the government planned to build a long-term nuclear repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, but that project was plagued by opposition. Activities on site ceased in 2010, leaving the nation’s nuclear waste to be stored more or less locally, where it’s been produced.The United States’ attempts to find a permanent home for its nuclear waste began in the 1980s when the government planned to build a long-term nuclear repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, but that project was plagued by opposition. Activities on site ceased in 2010, leaving the nation’s nuclear waste to be stored more or less locally, where it’s been produced.

Murray says the US needs a deep geological repository like Finland’s and with Yucca Mountain out of the equation, he’s looking for a second location for a permanent repository.

New Mexico nuke waste site offers lessons for others

Nevada's Yucca Mountain is the only permanent U.S. high-level waste storage site to have been studied since the 1980s. It's been mothballed since the Obama administration amid unyielding state opposition.

Andre Landim Fernandes Tackles Sustainability And Nuclear Waste Challenges Amid Climate Crisis

Despite decades of research and debate, the country still lacks a permanent solution for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste, with plans for a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada stalled due to political and regulatory hurdles (National Research Council, 2021).

100,000 years and counting: how do we tell future generations about highly radioactive nuclear waste repositories?

Yet nuclear energy production requires managing what is known as “spent” nuclear fuel where major problems arise about how best to safeguard these waste materials into the future – especially should nuclear energy production increase. Short-term storage facilities have been in place for decades, but the question of their long-term deposition has caused intense political debates, with a number of projects being delayed or cancelled entirely. In the United States, work on the Yucca Mountain facility has stopped completely leaving the country with 93 nuclear reactors and no long-term storage site for the waste they produce.

March 18, 2024

Danielle Endres Discusses Indigenous Resistance to Nuclear Waste

One of the events Endres covers in her book is the nuclear waste repository that was established on Yucca Mountain in 2002. After fierce resistance from the Shoshone people, Congress defunded the project in 2006 and it was later abandoned by the Barack Obama administration. After abandoning the project, the administration enacted a Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future. The commission released a report in 2012 that recommended a consent-based siting for storing nuclear waste.